Applied Wayfinding opens in New York City

The Manhattan office has been established to expand and service Applied’s growing number of clients in North and South America

Our active projects in North America include a Legible City programme for Cleveland, a campus wayfinding system for the University of Washington, and a wayfinding scheme in Vancouver, British Columbia. Previous work includes the I Walk NY, now WalkNYC, strategy for New York City.

According to our founder and partner Tim Fendley: “Over several years now we’ve worked extensively in Canada and continue to do well.

“Thanks to the global influence of our Legible London and Vancouver TransLink wayfinding, we have been successful in securing a number of projects in the US. Working in North America has always been our ambition.

“To add to this momentum we have established a US operation and as a global design centre New York is the best place to be,” said Tim.

Sam Coultrip is the latest addition to the Applied team and will be acting as Operations Coordinator for the US.

The SoHo office on Grand Street is being led by Sam Coultrip with additional recruits expected over the coming months. Sam, a UK national, has worked in design since the early 2000s, including in the Middle East, and moved to New York in 2013 where he has been implementing WalkNYC at a US consultancy.

Sam is keen to begin work with the Applied team, “This is a great opportunity to join one of the foremost wayfinding consultancies. I have been immensely impressed with the quality of the thinking and delivery from Applied and I am looking forward to being a part of bringing these methods to the US market.”

Stephen Read, Applied partner, said: “The US market is becoming more aware of what Legible City thinking can do. We’re looking to work for complexes, campus projects and whole city legibility schemes.”

According to Stephen, Sam is a valuable addition: “Sam is a skilled operator, and we feel he will represent and enhance our ability to deliver real quality for US clients. He’s well known to us and we’re very excited to be working with him.”

We have developed a wayfinding strategy at the University of Washington and we are currently prototyping wayfinding signage in Downtown Cleveland, ahead of a roll-out in 2015 that forms part of the city’s rejuvenation.

We are already in talks to add a senior planner to the team and are looking to bring in a designer in the near future.